Painting Kibera Blue

 


A few days ago, we finished construction of our second pilot site in Kibera. As one of the largest slums in the world, Kibera is home to nearly 1m people. The 3 sq. miles that Kibera stretches is divided into 8 villages. We are working in Soweto West with our community partner Carolina for Kibera. The pilot site will be operated by the Zulu Youth Group.

We’ve spent the past couple of posts explaining the model and the design. So we’ll get straight to the pictures this time. This time around we documented the construction process in detail to show exactly what it takes to put together a prefabricated ferrocement ecosan toilet in the slums of Nairobi. 
Before we can build, we have to dig out layers and layers of garbage.

Before we can build, we have to dig out layers and layers of garbage.

We dug two feet down, and it was still layers and layers of plastic bags.

We dug two feet down, and it was still layers and layers of plastic bags.

Laying down and leveling the prefabricated foundation posts.

Laying down and leveling the prefabricated foundation posts.

Topping it off with some mortar to attach the floor plate.

Topping it off with some mortar to attach the floor plate.

Installing the 3rd wall panel.

Installing the 3rd wall panel.

Pius installs the translucent corrugated roof sheet.

Pius installs the translucent corrugated roof sheet.

Epoxy coating on the floor for easy cleaning. Rounded corners on the walls and where the floor meets the wall to prevent buildup and improve cleanbility. Full collection barrels are sealed with a screw top lid and secured with a metal band prior to removal.

Epoxy coating on the floor for easy cleaning. Rounded corners on the walls and where the floor meets the wall to prevent buildup and improve cleanbility. Full collection barrels are sealed with a screw top lid and secured with a metal band prior to removal.

Removable squat plate installed.

Removable squat plate installed.

Ready for business!

Ready for business!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13697694085291374409 Jarrod

    Ani, you guys are doing some amazing work. I love following this blog… although some of the pictures scare the heck out of me. Either way it really helps make it very apparent how great the need is over in Kenya. Looking forward to catching up this year!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12192564602233089351 Joost Bonsen

    Hi Sanergy crew. Nice photo sequence. It looks like an UN-toilet! Like a personal peacekeeper;-) Excellent project indeed. Curious how people feel about such stand-alone facilities from a personal security point of view?–Joost

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17121949027152562180 Ani

    @Jarrod: Thanks for the encouragement!@Joost: Stand alone facilities are relatively common around here, though in much more rudimentary structures than ours. Since there will be a full-time person operating these toilets, security issues should be minimized. It is exactly issues like these that we are eager to test out during the pilot phase and revise our assumptions based on the reality.

  • Pingback: Mathare 10: Urban Community-Led Total Sanitation Leads to … Sanergy? « Sanergy

  • tj

    Hi,

    I think this is great and wonder if you’ve been in touch w/SOIL in Haiti (http://www.oursoil.org/). The addition of energy generation seems like a valuable benefit missing from their approach. Cheers!